PScene User's Guide




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Table Of Contents For Pscene

1.1 Scope

1.1.1 Identification

1.1.2 System Overview

1.1.3 Document Overview

1.2 Referenced Documents

1.2.1 Government Documents

1.2.1.1 Military Specifications

1.2.1.2 Military Standards

1.2.2 Non-Government Documents

1.2.2.1 Other Source Documents

1.3 Tutorials

1.3.1 TUTORIAL ONE: Starting Up and Shutting Down

1.3.2 TUTORIAL TWO: Creating a default scene

1.3.3 TUTORIAL THREE: Saving a scene and returning to the GUI.

1.3.4 TUTORIAL FOUR: Selecting a view-point for the scene

1.3.5 TUTORIAL FIVE: Selecting a range value for the view-point.

1.3.6 TUTORIAL SIX: Keyboard changes to the bore sight.

1.3.7 TUTORIAL SEVEN: Changing the bore sight with the mouse.

1.3.8 TUTORIAL EIGHT: User makes changes to the Application preferences.

1.3.9 TUTORIAL NINE: Change the Upper-most window displayed.

1.3.10 TUTORIAL TEN: Magnify(Reduce) a portion of the basemap displayed.

1.4 Functions

1.5 Tips and Techniques

1.6 Sudden Surprisesand how to solve them

1.7 NOTES

1.7.1 Abbreviations

1.7.2 File Extensions

1.7.3 Glossary

1.7.4 User Notes



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Related NIMAMUSE Documents


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READ THIS FIRST!

This User Guide is aimed at helping you gain a quick understanding of thisproduct and it's capabilities. The intent is to provide you with a simpleand effective learning tool for the 3D Perspective Scene Application.

If all you need from this manual is to rapidly gain an ability to produceperspective scene products of your own, skip to section 3, which is dedicatedto a step by step tutorial demonstration of the product. After followingthrough this section you should be capable of producing similar 3D perspectivescene products from any data that you select.

If you only need to make reference to details of technical functions thenskip to section 4. However, this document is a User Guide, not a referencemanual, so the functions are only briefly listed in the reference section4. The functions are grouped in task and feature order. An alphabetic listingis included to assist more experienced users.

As you gain more experience and expertise in using the product, you willbenefit from the helpful descriptions of special techniques, hints and tipson scene generation included in section 5.

Eventually problems and errors may be encountered. We have included someuseful problem solving techniques in section 6.

If problems persist, DON'T PANIC! Collect all the relevant details and contactyour designated support personnel who are trained to help you. But remember,they need your patience and clear details of your problem.

Although every effort has been made to ensure that this product behaves wellon many platforms, be warned that TSR products can interfere with the memoryallocated by DOS / Windows, and so should be removed if you experience problemsrunning this application.

1.1Scope

The 3D perspective Scene application enables you to quickly and easily buildperspective scenes from MUSE level 1 data sets. The approach to displayingdigital terrain used in this product is aimed at helping the user appreciateterrain, and clearly depicts variations in the Earth's slope and elevation.

This product should prove useful in the planning and execution of militaryoperations - defensive and offensive, strategic and planning.

1.1.1 Identification

This document provides user-oriented information for understanding and useof the 3D Perspective Scene Generation Application.

1.1.2 System Overview

This User Guide is intended to provide the instructions necessary to construct3D scenes from valid MUSE compliant basemap and digital terrain data operatingin Apple, Microsoft (MS) DOS, and UNIX system environments. The format ofthe documentation conforms to DOD-STD-2167A.

1.1.3 Document Overview

This document provides information necessary for using and/or maintainingthe standard 3D Perspective Scene Generation software. This document hasbeen organized into 8 major sections with the first section providing theintroduction, purpose, and scope of the User's Guide.

Section 1

Section 1 presents the scope of this document, including identification ofthe applicable CSCI(s), their stated purpose, and a document overview.

Section 2

Section 2 lists the referenced documents in this User Guide.

Section 3

Section 3 describes a hands-on demonstration of the 3D Scene GenerationApplication.

Section 4

Section 4 contains a list of 3D Perspective Scene Generation functions.

Section 5

Section 5 provides information on additional techniques and useful examplesthat are helpful to the user in developing advanced scenes.

Section 6

Section 6 provides information on problem solving and diagnostic methodsthat are likely to be useful to a user in the early stages of developingan experience with the 3D Scene Product.

Section 7

Section 7 is reserved for notes.

Section 8

Section 8 is a reference index.

1.2 ReferencedDocuments

1.2.1 Government Documents

The following Government documents are referenced within this User Guideor were used during its preparation.

1.2.1.1 Military Specifications

(None identified)

1.2.1.2 Military Standards

DOD-STD-2167A Military Standard for Defense System Software Development,dated 29 February 1988.

1.2.2 Non-Government Documents

The following Non-Government documents are referenced within this SoftwareDesign Document or were used during its preparation.

1.2.2.1 Other Source Documents

No Control Number Mapping Charting & Geodesy (MC&G) Utility SoftwareEnvironment (MUSE) Programmer's Manual, March 2, 1992 (draft).

1.3Tutorials

The 3D perspective scene application has been constructed to provide a verysimple means of generation of a 3D scene, without you having to make anyselection of input controls.

In this section you will perform a number of easy to follow tutorial examplesthat when completed will provide you with enough familiarity with the 3Dscene generation product, that you can independently generate scenes frommaps of your choice.

The Components

There are three main component modules in the Perspective Scene application:

Most of your time will be spent in the GUI, and the SID, whereas the SGMdoes it's work of building the scenes without needing or prompting for anyaction from you. The SGM will occasionally issue a progress message to keepyou informed of the current stage it has reached in the building of the scene.

The Graphical User Interface (GUI)

All of what you see and do in the GUI operates in a window.

The GUI itself has three visible windows:

However, all that is necessary to generate a 3D scene after starting theapplication is that you have access to a valid basemap. The application willplace you in the GUI, will allow you to generate the scene, and automaticallydisplay the resulting image.

The MENU BAR is your primary access to all the menu commands. The only timethat the MENU BAR is not visible is when you are viewing the program's output,or if you have moved a window and obscured it. You will see a highlightedmenu item when the menu bar is active; that menu title is the currently selecteditem.

If the menu command is followed by an ellipsis(...) choosing the commanddisplays a dialog box. If the command is followed by an arrow, then the commandleads to another menu (a DROP DOWN menu). If the command has neither an ellipsisor an arrow, the action occurs as soon as you choose the command.

The Perspective Scene application uses only the left mouse button.

You use a mouse to choose a command either by:

1) double clicking the desired menu item.

2) Selecting the desired menu item and then clicking the button in the dialogbox.

Note that some menu commands are unavailable when it would make no senseto use them. However, you can still get on-line help about temporarilyunavailable commands.

1.3.1 TUTORIAL ONE: Starting Up and ShuttingDown

Starting up the application may be the hardest part. How you run the 3DPerspective Scene application depends on the platform on which you are running.There are three likely ways that you can start the 3D perspective application.

If an application icon is available

STEP 1: On Windows platforms the application will most likely be accessiblefrom an icon. Merely double click on the icon to launch the application.

If an application icon is notavailable:

STEP 1: Under Windows you can start the application by entering File Manager,going to the directory muse_cd\muse\win3.x\bin and double clicking on PSCENE.EXE.

Under the SUN o/s you can start the program by typingmuse_cd/muse/sun/bin/pscene.exe.

You can be sure that the application has successfully been started if a messagebox entitled Perspective Scene Release Version 1.x is displayed on the screen.

To shut the application down move the cursor to the FILE item on the mainmenu bar, click and hold the mouse button down, highlight the EXIT item,and release the mouse button.

1.3.2 TUTORIAL TWO: Creating a defaultscene

In this tutorial you will learn how to create an impressive perspective scene,without the need for any complex instructions.

STEP 1: Start up the application as in Tutorial One. You will know that theapplication has started successfully because the About box for the applicationwill be displayed.

STEP 2: Click on the OK button to move on to the main window of the application.You can be sure that you have moved on successfully when the message boxis erased and the MENU BAR is displayed with the FILE option highlighted.

STEP 3: Select a raster image basemap.

Select FILE|Load Raster Image

A DROP DOWN menu displays the currently supported raster image formats. Inthis version you must have some knowledge of the currently available basemapimages and the formats in which they are stored.

A File list dialog box titled "Please Locate the filename file" is displayed( where filename is the name of the relevant file).

STEP 4: Select the directory MUSE\DATA\TERRAIN from the file list box.

The available basemap images with the currently selected format, are displayedin the list box.

Select the image. Remember that you can do this by either double clickingon the item in the list box, or select the item in the list box and thenclicking on the OK button.

A window titled "Basemap Status" is displayed. Messages that refer to theprogress of loading the basemap image and Digital Terrain Elevation (DTED)data are displayed on the baseline of this window.

Once the basemap image is loaded, the basemap is displayed in the BasemapWindow.

The application automatically compares the coverages of the basemap and itsassociated DTED. A warning message is displayed if the basemap images andDTED do not geographically overlap. Since basemap images and DTED are notsupplied as standard matched sets you may be presented frequently with thismessage.

STEP 5: Select the OK button.

A window titled "Data Entry" is displayed. In the future, this will playan important role in your creation of the view points of generated scenes.But for this initial Example:, the window will serve only to display detailsabout the scene viewpoint.

At this stage the basemap is updated with the field of view fan tool, a diagramthat greatly helps you select that view point of the scene that you wishto create. Nothing outside the fan will be included in the perspective scenecreated.

In more detail the field of view diagram is made up of a blue dot which isthe location of the point-of-interest (POI) that you want to be situatedin the center of the final perspective scene, and a red dot which is theobserver location on the basemap. The bore sight vector is the arrowed linedrawn between the observer and POI locations and bisects the field of viewfan.

The field of view fan tool, together with the POI can be moved around theimage using the tools in the Data Entry window and so used very effectivelyin the selection of views. However, for this first Example: we willtake the system defaults where the POI is located in the center of the basemap,the field of view is 40 degrees, the azimuth is 045 degrees (clockwise fromnorth) and the declination is 15 degrees (positive down from the horizontal).

STEP 6: To create a default scene:

Select the SCENE button in the Data Entry window.

If this is the first time that you have worked with this image messages thatinform that the application is "writing RGB images" and DTED terrain filesare displayed. This might take several seconds to accomplish, but it is animportant step. Currently there is no standardization between basemap imageand DTED data samples and at this point the application has checked and ensuredcoincident samples.

You can be sure that the process of creating a scene has begun when a windowtitled "Progress" is displayed.

The application is within the Scene Generation Module (SGM) at this timeand depending on the platform and size of data files can remain calculatingfor some time.

To increase your confidence that the application is indeed at work buildingthe scene a number of progress messages, together with a green sliding progressbar is displayed which indicates the proportion of the task completed. Youneed do no more at this stage.

A window titled "3D Scene Display Version 1.0" is displayed on completionof the scene process. An hour glass cursor indicates a pause as the finalscene is loaded and displayed.

1.3.3 TUTORIAL THREE: Saving a scene and returningto the GUI.

In this tutorial you will learn how to save a scene image as a newly namedfile, and then return to the perspective scene GUI.

STEP 1: Create a default image as in tutorial two.

STEP 2: Select File menu item from the 3-D scene Display menu.

This displays a POP-UP menu that lists options for loading and saving imagefiles.

STEP 3: Select the "Save As" Menu item.

A dialog box is displayed with a default file name, usually named "DEFAULT.PSV".You can save the scene image as that name, which will write over any previousfile of that name, or you can move the cursor into the text window and entera new name.

STEP 4: Select the OK button to save the file.

1.3.4 TUTORIAL FOUR: Selecting a view-pointfor the scene

In this tutorial you will learn how to modify the viewpoint of the perspectivescene, and get an understanding of the effects of changing the Azimuth,declination, and field of view.

STEP 1: Start up the application as in Tutorial One. You will know that theapplication has started successfully because the About box for the applicationwill be displayed.

Click on the OK button to move on to the main window of the application whenthe message box is erased and the MENU BAR is displayed with the FILE optionhighlighted.

As in the previous tutorials, chose a raster image basemap.

STEP 2: Select FILE|Load Raster Image

A DROP DOWN menu displays the currently supported raster image formats. Inthis version you must have some knowledge of the currently available basemapimages and the formats in which they are stored.

A File list dialog box titled "Please Locate the filename file" is displayed.

STEP 3: Select the directory MUSE\DATA\TERRAIN from the file list box.

The available basemap images with the currently selected format, are displayedin the list box.

STEP 4: Select the image. You can do this by either double clicking on theitem in the list box, or select the item in the list box and then clickingon the OK button.

A window titled " Basemap Status" is displayed. Messages that refer to theprogress of loading the basemap image and Digital Terrain Elevation (DTED)data are displayed on the baseline of this window.

Once the basemap image is loaded, the basemap is displayed in the BasemapWindow.

Remember that the application automatically compares the coverages of thebasemap and its associated DTED and will issue a warning message if the basemapimages and DTED do not geographically overlap.

STEP 5: Select the OK button.

A window titled "Data Entry" is displayed. This will now play an importantrole in your creation of the view points of generated scenes. The basemapis updated with the field of view fan tool, a diagram that greatly helpsyou select that view point of the scene that you wish to create, since nothingoutside the fan will be included in the perspective scene created.

See Tutorial 2 for details of the field-of-view fan tool. The field-of-viewfan tool, together with the POI can be moved around the image by changingthe controls in the Data Entry window.

STEP 6: Updating the view point variables to create a scene.

You can produce very powerful scenes by using the default viewpoint. However,sooner or later you will want to select other view points. The Data Entrywindow provides four variables that can be used to change the scene. Theseviewpoint variables can be changed by clicking on the associated arrow controls.The variable is updated and the field of view fan tool is redisplayed onthe basemap.

Azimuth: The direction in which the user is looking.

This is changed only by clicking on the associated arrows.

Looking toward a mountain from a plain is much more effective than lookingdown from a mountain top to a valley floor below. As you change the azimuthvalue, the field of view fan tool will be updated on the basemap.

Declination: The angle, measured positive down from the horizontal, of thebore sight line.

This is changed only by clicking on the associated arrows.

Low view points (created by low declination angles), can usually create verydramatic scenes as the terrain relief is displayed at its best. You willnot see any immediate effects of modifying the declination angle on thefield-of-view fan tool. Low negative declinations of (say) -5 degrees (remembera negative sign means you are looking UP) can be very effective if the observeris located in a depression and the view includes a mountainous background.However, a negative declination should not be used if the observer is locatedat the top of a hill, looking down to a valley or plain. If this view directionis selected you should expect to see sky or large black areas around themargins of the scene. This is not an error, you will have merely createda scene outside the boundaries of the visible terrain.

The current user interface is oriented to a ground-based target referencecoordinate system, where the bore-sight is considered to emerge from theterrain at the target location. You should be careful not to confuse thealternative reference system of the bore-sight emerging from the observer'seye. A consequence of this 'ground-based' reference system is that the GUItool might not permit you to select an observer position above the terrainsurface.

Field Of View: The angle subtended at the eye by the boundary of the viewportwindow.

This is changed only by clicking on the associated arrows.

Wide fields of view that exceed 60 degrees are comparable to wide-angle lensesand can result in very dramatic scenes.

Narrow fields of view that are less than 30 degrees generate scenes thatare similar to telephoto lenses.

As you change the azimuth value, the field of view fan tool will be updatedon the basemap.

Vertical Exaggeration: The scale of exaggeration of the vertical elevationdisplay.

This is changed only by clicking on the associated arrows.

You will not see any immediate effects of modifying the vertical exaggerationon the field-of-view fan tool.

STEP 7: Before you forget, move the mouse cursor to the UPDATE button andclick.

This action updates the field-of-view fan tool, and a new fan diagram isdrawn on the basemap indicating the visible and non-visible regions in thescene.

STEP 8: Select the SCENE button in the Data Entry window.

If this is the first time that you have worked with this image messages thatinform that the application is "writing RGB images" and DTED terrain filesare displayed. This might take several seconds to accomplish, but it is animportant step. Currently there is no standardization between basemap imageand DTED data samples and at this point the application has checked and ensuredcoincident samples.

You can be sure that the process of creating a scene has begun when a windowtitled "Progress" is displayed.

The application is within the Scene Generation Module (SGM) at this timeand depending on the platform and size of data files can remain calculatingfor some time.

To increase your confidence that the application is indeed at work buildingthe scene a number of progress messages, together with a green sliding progressbar is displayed which indicates the proportion of the task completed. Youneed do no more at this stage.

A window titled "3D Scene Display Version 1.0" is displayed on completionof the scene process. An hour glass cursor indicates a pause as the finalscene is loaded and displayed.

1.3.5 TUTORIAL FIVE: Selecting a range valuefor the view-point.

In this tutorial you will learn the effect of selecting a short as opposedto a long range value.

STEP 1: Start up the application as in Tutorial One. You will know that theapplication has started successfully because the About box for the applicationwill be displayed.

Click on the OK button to move on to the main window of the application whenthe message box is erased and the MENU BAR is displayed with the FILE optionhighlighted.

As in the previous tutorials, chose a raster image basemap.

STEP 2: Select FILE|Load Raster Image

A DROP DOWN menu displays the currently supported raster image formats. Inthis version you must have some knowledge of the currently available basemapimages and the formats in which they are stored.

A File list dialog box titled "Please Locate the filename file" is displayed.

STEP 3: Select the directory MUSE\DATA\TERRAIN from the file list box.

The available basemap images with the currently selected format, are displayedin the list box.

STEP 4: Select the image. You can do this by either double clicking on theitem in the list box, or select the item in the list box and then clickingon the OK button.

A window titled " Basemap Status" is displayed. Messages that refer to theprogress of loading the basemap image and Digital Terrain Elevation (DTED)data are displayed on the baseline of this window.

Once the basemap image is loaded, the basemap is displayed in the BasemapWindow.

Remember that the application automatically compares the coverages of thebasemap and its associated DTED and will issue a warning message if the basemapimages and DTED do not geographically overlap.

STEP 5: Select the OK button.

A window titled "Data Entry" is displayed. This will now play an importantrole in your creation of the view points of generated scenes. The basemapis updated with the field of view fan tool, a diagram that greatly helpsyou select that view point of the scene that you wish to create, since nothingoutside the fan will be included in the perspective scene created.

See Tutorial 2 for details of the field-of-view fan tool. The field of viewfan tool, together with the POI can be moved around the image by changingthe controls in the Data Entry window.

STEP 6: Updating the view point variables to create a scene:

One of the most significant variables in changing the scene is the range.A large range number places the viewpoint far from the point of interestat a long range, whereas a small range number places the viewpoint near tothe point of interest, at a short range.

STEP 7: Updating the range variable by keyboard entry.

Move the mouse cursor to the range box and click on the text string. Modifythe range by increasing the range number by About two times. This is easiestto do if you simply click on the leftmost text position and type in a number.

STEP 8: Before you forget, move the mouse cursor to the UPDATE button andclick.

This action updates the field-of-view fan tool, and a new fan diagram isdrawn on the basemap indicating the visible and non-visible regions in thescene.

The Data Entry window provides keyboard edit access to five other variablesthat can be used to change the scene and obtain feed-back to the user.

Each time the UPDATE button is selected the updated field of view fan toolis displayed on the basemap.

STEP 9: Select the SCENE button in the Data Entry window.

If this is the first time that you have worked with this image messages thatinform that the application is "writing RGB images" and DTED terrain filesare displayed. This might take several seconds to accomplish, but it is animportant step. Currently there is no standardization between basemap imageand DTED data samples and at this point the application has checked and ensuredcoincident samples.

You can be sure that the process of creating a scene has begun when a windowtitled "Progress" is displayed.

The application is within the Scene Generation Module (SGM) at this timeand depending on the platform and size of data files can remain calculatingfor some time.

To increase your confidence that the application is indeed at work buildingthe scene a number of progress messages, together with a green sliding progressbar is displayed which indicates the proportion of the task completed. Youneed do no more at this stage.

A window titled "3D Scene Display Version 1.0" is displayed on completionof the scene process. An hour glass cursor indicates a pause as the finalscene is loaded and displayed.

1.3.6 TUTORIAL SIX: Keyboard changes to thebore sight.

In this tutorial you will learn how to interactively change the point-of-interestand the observer positions by using the keyboard in the Data Entry window.

STEP 1: Start up the application as in Tutorial One. You will know that theapplication has started successfully because the About box for the applicationwill be displayed.

Click on the OK button to move on to the main window of the application whenthe message box is erased and the MENU BAR is displayed with the FILE optionhighlighted.

As in the previous tutorials, chose a raster image basemap.

STEP 2: Select FILE|Load Raster Image

A DROP DOWN menu displays the currently supported raster image formats. Inthis version you must have some knowledge of the currently available basemapimages and the formats in which they are stored.

A File list dialog box titled "Please Locate the filename file" is displayed.

STEP 3: Select the directory MUSE\DATA\TERRAIN from the file list box.

The available basemap images with the currently selected format, are displayedin the list box.

STEP 4: Select the image. You can do this by either double clicking on theitem in the list box, or select the item in the list box and then clickingon the OK button.

A window titled " Basemap Status" is displayed. Messages that refer to theprogress of loading the basemap image and Digital Terrain Elevation (DTED)data are displayed on the baseline of this window.

Once the basemap image is loaded, the basemap is displayed in the BasemapWindow.

Remember that the application automatically compares the coverages of thebasemap and its associated DTED and will issue a warning message if the basemapimages and DTED do not geographically overlap.

STEP 5: Select the OK button.

A window titled "Data Entry" is displayed. This will now play an importantrole in your creation of the view points of generated scenes. The basemapis updated with the field of view fan tool, a diagram that greatly helpsyou select that view point of the scene that you wish to create, since nothingoutside the fan will be included in the perspective scene created.

See Tutorial 2 for details of the field-of-view fan tool. The field of viewfan tool, together with the POI can be moved around the image by changingthe controls in the Data Entry window.

STEP 6: Update the Point-of-Interest(Observer) on the basemap by first movingthe cursor into the appropriate text box in the Data Entry window.

STEP 7: From the keyboard enter the coordinates of the newPoint-of-Interest(Observer) location.

STEP 8: Before you forget, move the mouse cursor to the UPDATE button andclick.

This action updates the field-of-view fan tool, and a new fan diagram isdrawn on the basemap indicating the visible and non-visible regions in thescene.

The Data Entry window provides keyboard edit access to five other variablesthat can be used to change the scene and obtain feed-back to the user.

Each time the UPDATE button is selected the updated field of view fan toolis re displayed on the basemap.

STEP 10: Select the SCENE button in the Data Entry window.

You can be sure that the process of creating a scene has begun when a windowtitled "Progress" is displayed.

You need do no more at this stage.

A window titled "3D Scene Display Version 1.0" is displayed on completionof the scene process. An hour glass cursor indicates a pause as the finalscene is loaded and displayed.

1.3.7 TUTORIAL SEVEN: Changing the bore sightwith the mouse.

In this tutorial you will learn how to interactively change the point-of-interestand the observer positions by using the mouse.

STEP 1: Start up the application as in Tutorial One. You will know that theapplication has started successfully because the About box for the applicationwill be displayed.

Click on the OK button to move on to the main window of the application whenthe message box is erased and the MENU BAR is displayed with the FILE optionhighlighted.

As in the previous tutorials, chose a raster image basemap.

STEP 2: Select FILE|Load Raster Image

A DROP DOWN menu displays the currently supported raster image formats. Inthis version you must have some knowledge of the currently available basemapimages and the formats in which they are stored.

A File list dialog box titled "Please Locate the filename file" is displayed.

STEP 3: Select the directory MUSE\DATA\TERRAIN from the file list box.

The available basemap images with the currently selected format, are displayedin the list box.

STEP 4: Select the image. You can do this by either double clicking on theitem in the list box, or select the item in the list box and then clickingon the OK button.

A window titled " Basemap Status" is displayed. Messages that refer to theprogress of loading the basemap image and Digital Terrain Elevation (DTED)data are displayed on the baseline of this window.

Once the basemap image is loaded, the basemap is displayed in the BasemapWindow.

Remember that the application automatically compares the coverages of thebasemap and its associated DTED and will issue a warning message if the basemapimages and DTED do not geographically overlap.

STEP 5: Select the OK button.

A window titled "Data Entry" is displayed. This will now play an importantrole in your creation of the view points of generated scenes. The basemapis updated with the field of view fan tool, a diagram that greatly helpsyou select that view point of the scene that you wish to create, since nothingoutside the fan will be included in the perspective scene created.

See Tutorial 2 for details of the field-of-view fan tool. The field of viewfan tool, together with the POI can be moved around the image by changingthe controls in the Data Entry window.

STEP 6: Update the Point-of-Interest(Observer) on the basemap by first movingthe cursor into the basemap window.

The cursor will change from an arrow to a fine cross. On some VDUs the crossmay be faint. As you move the cursor around the basemap that has underlyingDTED coverage, you will get real-time feedback of the elevations at the DTEDnodes on the base line of the basemap status window.

STEP 7: To latch onto the Point-of-Interest(Observer) move the cursor tothe red(blue) colored symbol marking the location of thepoint-of-interest(observer). Click the mouse when the cursor is over thesymbol. The cross-shaped cursor will change to a square, indicating thatyou have latched on to the location.

STEP 8: To update the location, still holding the mouse button down, movethe center of the square cursor to the desired location and release the mousebutton.

STEP 9: Before you forget, if you have entered any data in the data entrymenu, move the mouse cursor to the UPDATE button and click.

Regardless, this action updates the field-of-view fan tool, and a new fandiagram is drawn on the basemap indicating the visible and non-visible regionsin the scene.

The Data Entry window provides keyboard edit access to five other variablesthat can be used to change the scene and obtain feed-back to the user.

Each time the UPDATE button is selected the updated field of view fan toolis re displayed on the basemap.

STEP 10: Select the SCENE button in the Data Entry window.

You can be sure that the process of creating a scene has begun when a windowtitled "Progress" is displayed.

You need do no more at this stage.

A window titled "3D Scene Display Version 1.0" is displayed on completionof the scene process. An hour glass cursor indicates a pause as the finalscene is loaded and displayed.

1.3.7 TUTORIAL EIGHT: User makes changes tothe Application preferences.

In this tutorial you will learn how to interactively change the ApplicationPreferences menu. If you make changes to the user preferences they can besaved or reset at any time.

STEP 1: Start up the application as in Tutorial One. You will know that theapplication has started successfully because the About box for the applicationwill be displayed.

Click on the OK button to move on to the main window of the application whenthe message box is erased and the MENU BAR is displayed with the FILE optionhighlighted.

STEP 2: Select FILE|Preferences

A Dialog box displays the currently supported user preference library.

STEP 3: Select the available options by clicking on the selected radio buttons.

STEP 4: Select the SAVE button to save the current preferences.

1.3.9 TUTORIAL NINE: Change the Upper-mostwindow displayed.

In this tutorial you will learn how to pick the available current windowthat is displayed uppermost.

STEP 1: Start up the application as in Tutorial One. You will know that theapplication has started successfully because the About box for the applicationwill be displayed.

Click on the OK button to move on to the main window of the application whenthe message box is erased and the MENU BAR is displayed with the FILE optionhighlighted.

As in the previous tutorials, choose a raster image basemap.

STEP 2: Select FILE|Load Raster Image

A DROP DOWN menu displays the currently supported raster image formats. Inthis version you must have some knowledge of the currently available basemapimages and the formats in which they are stored.

A File list dialog box titled "Please Locate the filename file" is displayed.

STEP 3: Select the directory MUSE\DATA from the file list box.

The available basemap images with the currently selected format, are displayedin the list box.

STEP 4: Select the image. You can do this by either double clicking on theitem in the list box, or select the item in the list box and then clickingon the OK button.

A window titled " Basemap Status" is displayed. Messages that refer to theprogress of loading the basemap image and Digital Terrain Elevation (DTED)data are displayed on the baseline of this window.

Once the basemap image is loaded, the basemap is displayed in the BasemapWindow.

Remember that the application automatically compares the coverages of thebasemap and its associated DTED and will issue a warning message if the basemapimages and DTED do not geographically overlap.

STEP 5: Select the OK button.

A window titled "Data Entry" is displayed. This will now play an importantrole in your creation of the view points of generated scenes. The basemapis updated with the field of view fan tool, a diagram that greatly helpsyou select that view point of the scene that you wish to create, since nothingoutside the fan will be included in the perspective scene created.

STEP 6: Select VIEW

A DROP DOWN menu displays the currently available windows.

STEP 7: Select the menu item for the available window that you wish to becomeuppermost in the Application Desktop.

The selected window is re drawn uppermost in the Desktop.

1.3.10 TUTORIAL TEN: Magnify(Reduce) a portionof the basemap displayed.

In this tutorial you will learn how to zoom-in(Zoom-Out) and magnify(reduce)by a factor of two the current basemap window. This is useful for examiningdetailed(large-scale) areas of the basemap.

STEP 1: Start up the application as in Tutorial One. You will know that theapplication has started successfully because the About box for the applicationwill be displayed.

Click on the OK button to move on to the main window of the application whenthe message box is erased and the MENU BAR is displayed with the FILE optionhighlighted.

As in the previous tutorials, chose a raster image basemap.

STEP 2: Select FILE|Load Raster Image

A DROP DOWN menu displays the currently supported raster image formats. Inthis version you must have some knowledge of the currently available basemapimages and the formats in which they are stored.

A File list dialog box titled "Please Locate the filename file"

is displayed.

STEP 3: Select the directory MUSE\DATA\TERRAIN from the file list box.

The available basemap images with the currently selected format, are displayedin the list box.

STEP 4: Select the image.

You can do this by either double clicking on the item in the list box, orselect the item in the list box and then clicking on the OK button.

A window titled " Basemap Status" is displayed. Messages that refer to theprogress of loading the basemap image and Digital Terrain Elevation (DTED)data are displayed on the baseline of this window.

Once the basemap image is loaded, the basemap is displayed in the BasemapWindow.

Remember that the application automatically compares the coverages of thebasemap and its associated DTED and will issue a warning message if the basemapimages and DTED do not geographically overlap.

STEP 5: Select the OK button.

A window titled "Data Entry" is displayed. This will now play an importantrole in your creation of the view points of generated scenes. The basemapis updated with the field of view fan tool, a diagram that greatly helpsyou select that view point of the scene that you wish to create, since nothingoutside the fan will be included in the perspective scene created.

STEP 6: Select VIEW

A DROP DOWN menu displays the currently available windows.

STEP 7: Select the menu item for the basemap to become uppermost in theApplication Desktop.

The selected basemap window is re drawn uppermost in the Desktop.

STEP 8: Select the Zoom-In(Zoom-Out) menu item for the enlarged (reduced)basemapto be displayed uppermost in the Application Desktop.

1.4Functions

Graphical User Interface Functions

Function: FILE

Purpose: Load image files

Menu Item: Main

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: Provides file manipulation functions.

Sub Menu:

See also

Example:

Function: FILE|Load Raster Image

Purpose: Load image files

Menu Item: Main

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: Provides user ability to select supported image formats.

Sub Menu: Load Raster Images

See Also:

Example: On starting application user must perform initial selectionof basemap image.

Function: FILE|Close Map

Purpose: Closes currently loaded image files

Menu Item: Main

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: Provides user ability to close old image and select new image.

Sub Menu:

See Also: Load Raster Images

Example: On loading new image user must close previously displayedbasemap image.

Function: FILE|Preferences

Purpose: Selects user preferred input units and system defaults

Menu Item: FILE

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: Provides user ability to work in currently available degreeunits, elevations as AMSL or AGL, activate blue sky background, and outputimage dimensions.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User modifies system preferences at start up.

Function: FILE|About

Purpose: Provides Version and release information

Menu Item: FILE

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: User can obtain current version information for supportreference.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User requires version and release information for productsupport.

Function: FILE|Quit

Purpose: Controlled exit from Application

Menu Item: FILE

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: User can exit from application.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User ends session.

Function: Reset

Purpose: Resets system settings

Menu Item: Reset

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: Resets original system settings or returns to last userpreference settings.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example:: User wishes to return to previous system settings.

Function: RESET|Original Basemap Settings

Purpose: Resets to original system settings

Menu Item: Reset

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: Resets original system settings.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User wishes to return to original system settings.

Function: RESET|Last Scene Settings

Purpose: Resets to previous user preference settings

Menu Item: Reset

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: Restores last user preference settings.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User wishes to return to previous user preference settings.

Function: View

Purpose: Provides method to change viewing variables.

Menu Item: View

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: Brings uppermost selected window.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User wishes to make visible an obscured window.

Function: VIEW|Data Entry Window

Purpose: Selects Data Entry Window as upper most window of GUI.

Menu Item: View

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: Brings uppermost selected window .

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User wishes to make visible an obscured Data Entry Windowfor scene generation.

Function: VIEW|Basemap Window

Purpose: Selects Basemap Window as upper most window of GUI.

Menu Item: View

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: Brings uppermost selected window .

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User wishes to make visible an obscured Basemap Window forviewing the scene.

Function: VIEW|Basemap Status Window

Purpose: Selects Basemap Status Window as upper most window of GUI.

Menu Item: View

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: Brings uppermost selected window .

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User wishes to make visible an obscured Basemap Status Windowfor viewing DTED elevations in the basemap.

Function: VIEW|Zoom In

Purpose: Selects Zoomed in region of Basemap window of GUI.

Menu Item: View

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: Enlarges portion of selected window .

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User wishes to enlarge a part of the basemap.

Function: VIEW|Zoom Out

Purpose: Selects Zoomed out region of Basemap window of GUI.

Menu Item: View

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: Reduces portion of selected window.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User wishes to reduce a part of the basemap.

Function: Locate Image File

Purpose: Locates image file through file dialog box.

Menu Item: Load Raster Images

Syntax:

Window: GUI|load raster image

Remarks: Standard File Dialog Box.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User wishes to find raster image file of the basemap.

Function: File list box

Purpose: Lists image files through file dialog box.

Menu Item: Load Raster Images

Syntax:

Window: GUI|load raster image

Remarks: Standard File Dialog Box.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User selects from list of available raster image files forthe basemap.

Function: Directory list box

Purpose: Lists Directories available through dialog box.

Menu Item: Load Raster Images

Syntax:

Window: GUI|load raster image

Remarks: Standard Directory List Box.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User selects from list of available directories.

Function: File Types

Purpose: Allows user to select supported image file suffixes thatdefine image file types.

Menu Item: Load Raster Images

Syntax:

Window: GUI|load raster image

Remarks: Standard List Box.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User selects from list of available image file types.

Function: Drives

Purpose: Allows user to select supported drives.

Menu Item: Load Raster Images

Syntax:

Window: GUI|load raster image

Remarks: Standard List Box.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User selects from list of available drives.

Function: SCENE

Purpose: Launches scene generation process.

Menu Item: SCENE

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Data Entry

Remarks: Starts processes that generate scene.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: After user selects viewpoint for chosen scene

Function: UPDATE

Purpose: Updates scene variables entered from Data Entry dialog andupdates basemap field of view tool.

Menu Item: UPDATE

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Data Entry

Remarks: Updates field of view tool used to select.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User selects viewpoint for chosen scene by keyboard entryand wishes to view updated field of view tool diagram.

Function: Azimuth

Purpose: Updates Azimuth for scene variable entered from Data Entrydialog view tool.

Menu Item: Azimuth

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Data Entry

Remarks: Updates Azimuth used to generate scene.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User selects Azimuth for chosen scene by mouse-arrow entry.

Function: Field of View

Purpose: Updates Field Of View for scene variable entered from DataEntry dialog.

Menu Item: Field Of View

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Data Entry

Remarks: Updates Field Of View used to generate scene and so widensor narrows view.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User selects Field Of View for chosen scene by mouse-arrowentry.

Function: Declination Angle

Purpose: Updates Declination Angle for scene variable entered fromData Entry dialog.

Menu Item: Declination Angle

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Data Entry

Remarks: Updates Declination Angle used to generate scene and so changesviewpoint.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User selects Declination angle for chosen scene by mouse-arrowentry.

Function: Height Exaggeration

Purpose: Updates Height Exaggeration for scene variable entered fromData Entry dialog.

Menu Item: Height Exaggeration

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Data Entry

Remarks: Updates Height Exaggeration used to generate scene and sochanges terrain appearance.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User selects greater Height Exaggeration in order to increaseeffect of terrain relief for chosen scene by mouse-arrow entry.

Function: Range

Purpose: Updates Range for scene variable entered from Data Entrydialog.

Menu Item: Range

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Data Entry

Remarks: Updates ground distance from observer to POI used to generatescene.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User modifies Range in order change viewpoint for chosenscene by mouse-arrow entry.

Function: Observer Altitude

Purpose: Updates Observer Altitude for scene variable entered fromData Entry dialog.

Menu Item: Observer Altitude

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Data Entry

Remarks: Updates AMSL altitude of observer used to generate scene.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User modifies Observer Altitude in order change viewpointfor chosen scene by mouse-arrow entry.

Function: Observer Latitude

Purpose: Updates Observer Latitude for scene variable entered fromData Entry dialog.

Menu Item: Observer Latitude

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Data Entry

Remarks: Updates Latitude of observer used to generate scene.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User modifies Observer Latitude in order change viewpointfor chosen scene by mouse-arrow entry.

Function: Observer Longitude

Purpose: Updates Observer Longitude for scene variable entered fromData Entry dialog.

Menu Item: Observer Latitude

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Data Entry

Remarks: Updates Longitude of observer used to generate scene.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User modifies Observer Longitude in order change viewpointfor chosen scene by mouse-arrow entry.

Function: POI Latitude

Purpose: Updates POI Latitude for scene variable entered from DataEntry dialog.

Menu Item: Observer Latitude

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Data Entry

Remarks: Updates Latitude of POI used to generate scene.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User modifies POI Latitude in order change viewpoint forchosen scene by mouse-arrow entry.

Function: POI Longitude

Purpose: Updates POI Longitude for scene variable entered from DataEntry dialog.

Menu Item: POI Latitude

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Data Entry

Remarks: Updates Longitude of POI used to generate scene.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User modifies POI Longitude in order change viewpoint forchosen scene by mouse-arrow entry.

Function: AMSL

Purpose: Selects Above Mean Sea Level(AMSL) as the elevation referencedatum.

Menu Item: Preferences

Syntax:

Window: GUI|preferences

Remarks: Updates user preference reference datum.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User selects convenient reference datum.

Function: AGL

Purpose: Selects Above Ground Level(AGL) as the elevation referencedatum.

Menu Item: Preferences

Syntax:

Window: GUI|preferences

Remarks: Updates user preference reference datum.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User selects convenient reference datum.

Function: Decimal Degrees

Purpose: Selects Decimal Degrees as the geographic coordinate system.

Menu Item: GUI|preferences

Syntax:

Window: Main GUI

Remarks: Updates user preference for coordinates.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User selects convenient coordinate system.

Function: Deg Min Sec

Purpose: Selects Degrees-Minutes-Seconds as the geographic coordinatesystem.

Menu Item: GUI|Preferences

Syntax:

Window: Main GUI

Remarks: Updates user preference for coordinates.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User selects convenient coordinate system.

Function: Meters

Purpose: Selects Meters as the distance measurement system.

Menu Item: Preferences|distance Units

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Preferences

Remarks: Updates user preference for ground distance measurement system.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User selects convenient ground measurement system.

Function: Feet

Purpose: Selects Feet as the distance measurement system.

Menu Item: Preferences|Distance Units

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Preferences

Remarks: Updates user preference for ground distance measurement system.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User selects convenient ground measurement system.

Function: Blue Sky

Purpose: Activates Blue Sky as the distant background color.

Menu Item: Preferences|Perspective Scene Sky Preference

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Preferences

Remarks: Updates user preference for Sky color.

See Also:

Example: User selects if blue or black color is used for distant skybackground.

Function: Width

Purpose: Selects size of output scene in pixels.

Menu Item: Preferences|Perspective Scene Image Display Size

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Preferences

Remarks: Updates user preference for output scene width.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User selects output scene width.

Function: Height

Purpose: Selects size of output scene in pixels.

Menu Item: Preferences|Perspective Scene Image Display Size

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Preferences

Remarks: Updates user preference for output scene Height.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User selects output scene height.

Function: OK

Purpose: Selects current preferences.

Menu Item: Preferences

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Preferences

Remarks: Updates user preferences.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User selects new preferences.

Function: Cancel

Purpose: Selects cancels current preferences.

Menu Item: Preferences

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Preferences

Remarks: Cancels modifications to user preferences.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User cancels new preferences.

Function: Save

Purpose: Selects Save current preferences.

Menu Item: Preferences

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Preferences

Remarks: Saves modifications to user preferences.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User saves new preferences.

Function: Reset

Purpose: Selects resets previous preferences.

Menu Item: Preferences

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Preferences

Remarks: Resets modifications to user preferences.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User resets previous preferences.

Function: Help

Purpose: Selects Help for perspective scene application.

Menu Item: Preferences

Syntax:

Window: GUI|Preferences

Remarks: User can obtain general help on application.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User requires general Help.

Scene Image Display Functions

Function: FILE

Purpose: Load image files

Menu Item: File

Syntax:

Window: 3D Scene Display|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: Provides user ability to select supported image formats.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: On starting application user must perform initial selectionof Scene image.

Function: FILE|Close Image

Purpose: Closes currently loaded image files

Menu Item: Main

Syntax:

Window: 3D Scene Display|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: Provides user ability to close old image and select new image.

Sub Menu:

See Also: Load Raster Images

Example: On loading new image user must close previously displayedbasemap image.

Function: FILE|About

Purpose: Provides Version and release information

Menu Item: FILE

Syntax:

Window: 3D Scene Display|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: User can obtain current version information for supportreference.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User requires version and release information for productsupport.

Function: FILE|Quit

Purpose: Controlled exit from Application

Menu Item: FILE

Syntax:

Window: 3D Scene Display|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: User can exit from application.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User ends session.

Function: Save Image

Purpose: Saves image as a default

Menu Item: FILE

Syntax:

Window: 3D Scene Display|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: User can save image to use as default.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User saves image and ends session.

Function: FILE|Save Image As

Purpose: Saves image with a user specified name

Menu Item: FILE

Syntax:

Window: 3D Scene Display|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: User can save image under a specified name.

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User saves image and ends session.

Function: FILE|Expand (2x)

Purpose: Doubles image size.

Menu Item: FILE

Syntax:

Window: 3D Scene Display|Main Menu Bar

Remarks: User can save enlarge image

Sub Menu:

See Also:

Example: User enlarges image 2x.

1.5 Tips andTechniques

Good-looking 3D perspective scenes are generated from dramatic view points.However, the desire to select dramatic view points can produce surprisingor disappointing results. Looking toward a mountain from a plain is muchmore effective than looking down from a mountain top to a valley floor below.Low viewpoints created by low declination angles (+/-), can usually createvery dramatic scenes as the terrain relief is displayed at its best. However,high viewpoints ( created by high declination angles ), usually result indisappointing scenes because the terrain relief is fore-shortened and sois dull looking.

Wide fields of view that exceed 60 degrees are comparable to wide-angle lensesand can result in very dramatic scenes. However, fields of view around 90degrees or more can prove quite un-natural views and cause confusion to aninexperienced user.

Narrow fields of view that are less than 30 degrees are similar to telephotolenses, and very narrow fields of view can result in fore-shortened sceneswhere because the depth of scene cannot be easily discerned, the scene looksun-natural.

Where possible, viewpoints should be picked with these guide lines in mind,because a dramatic scene is a communicative scene, and provides powerfulevidence of the link between 2D maps and the actual 3D scene. But a scenethat lacks realism or lacks impact can cause doubt and confusion if the usercannot recognize the relationship between map and 3D scene.

1.6Sudden Surprises and how to solve them

Sudden surprises are those unexpected events that occur in a procedure thatyou have performed previously with no problem. You can not be prepared forevery possible problem, nor can you expect to surmount every difficulty thatyou might encounter when using this product. However, there are a few commondifficulties that you may suddenly encounter, that you can diagnose and solvefor yourself. Here are some of the most common problems that you might encounter,and what to do about them...

The internal color palette used by the window has been corrupted, by anotherapplication. Quit Windows and restart.

Not really a sudden surprise, more a latent discovery. The graphics cardor the graphics driver loaded on your computer is not capable of supporting256 colors. Either load a 256 color driver and/or upgrade the graphics cardto support 256 colors.

FATAL: This is an internal error in one of the active software modules. Contactyour support representative.

FATAL: The application has run out of available heap memory because of anerror in the MUSE library. Contact your support representative.

This is not fatal. For some reason the window manager has lost it's placein the window list but the application will complete the scene generationand display the image.

This is not fatal. Delete the file TMP*.* from the LOS\PSCENE\BIN directory.

This is not fatal. This effect depends on the speed of the machine. To displayvalues of DTED in an area, simply move the cursor slower if you suspect thiseffect.

This usually is caused by the user having entered a latitude or longitudefollowed directly (without a space) by the northing/easting letter. Re-enterwith a space between the number and the letter coordinate. For example, 101.0E rather than 101.0E.

Help files are found automatically only if the correct working directoryis specified in the Windows 'Properties' dialog box.

1.7NOTES

1.7.1 Abbreviations

ADRG ARC Digitized Raster Graphics

ANSI Military Standard for American National Standards Ins

CDROM Compact Disk Read Only Mememory

CSCI Computer Software Configuration Item

DMA Defense Mapping Agency

DTD Digital Topographic Data

DTED Digital Topographic Elevation Data

STP Software Test Plan

1.7.2 File Extensions

.LOS Line of Sight Product

.PSV Scene Location file

.PSM Basemap location file

.HLP Help file

.ADR MUSE ADRG-raster file

.DTE MUSE DTED-raster file

.DBD MUSE DBDB5-raster file

.CAC MUSE CAC-raster file

.IMA MUSE generic-raster file

1.7.3 Glossary

azimuth: The direction in which the user is looking.

basemap: The map in the region of interest. Usually refers to the scannedimage of the cartographic product.

boresight tool: The vector drawn between the observer and the target.

declination: The angle, measured positive down from the from the horizontal,of the bore sight line along which the user is looking.

Digital Terrain Elevation Data: Digital values of elevation usually on aregular orthogonal grid.

Field-Of-View: The angle subtended at the eye by the boundary of the viewportwindow.

Line of Sight: Straight line between the eye of the observer and thepoint-of-interest in the scene, or more genarally the target.

LOS Map Product: Line of Sight visibility diagram generated as the resultof the LOS application.

MUSE: Mapping ,Charting and Geodesy Utility Software Environment.

MC&G: Mapping, Charting & Geodesy.

observer-to-target relationship: The bore sight.

point-of-interest (POI): The location within the basemap that will becomethe center of the perspective scene.

profile: The vertical section of the elevation plotted against horizontaldistance.

range: The distance between the observer and the target.

raster image: Digital image built from rows and columns of pixels. Usuallyrefers to scanned basemap images, or satellite images.

scene generation: The process of construction of the perspective scene, thatis invoked after the user configures the view point parameters.

visibility sector diagram: The product of the line of sight drawn on a basemap.The diagram can be subdivided into visible and non-visible regions.

vertical exaggeration: The scale of exaggeration of the vertical elevationdisplay.

1.7.4 User Notes:

This software has been found to work with the following graphics cards:

8514/A video boards

ACTIX Graphics Engine Ultra

AHEAD VGA Wizard

ATI Ultra Pro

ATI VGA Wonder

COMPUADD video boards

Farenheit 1280

Paradise video boards

Trident 512k VGA board

VOLANTE video board



---------------------------------------------




Related NIMAMUSEDocuments


Perspective Scene    PSCENE.DOC

Line of Sight    LOS.DOC

Line of Sight Application Reference   LOS_UG.DOC

Datum Transformation and Coordinate Conversion4, DTCC4    DTCC4.DOC

DTCC4 Users Guide   DTCC4_UG.DOC

VPFView   VPFVIEW.DOC

VPFView User's Guide   VPFV_UG.DOC

Raster Importer   RAST_IMP.DOC

Raster Importer Users Guide  RAST_UG.DOC

Vector Importer   VPF_IMP.DOC

Vector Importer Users Guide  VPFI_UG.DOC

Fusion   FUSION.DOC

Fusion Users Guide   FUS_UG.DOC

Access and Prepare NIMA Digital Data  APNDD.DOC

Build Your Own Map   BYOM.DOC

Run Specialty Applications   RSA.DOC

NIMAMUSE 2.1 Documentation   INTRO.DOC